Course Detail

New Venture Strategy (34102)

Course Description by Faculty

  • Bunch, Gregory
  • Content
    For autumn quarter, this class will be offered in dual mode but it is possible that the faculty member will not be in the classroom.

    This course primarily is designed to benefit entrepreneurs, early stage investors and corporate managers responsible for new ventures. The course builds non-mathematical models of success in the world of entrepreneurial business through intensive analyses of both archival and current cases. Students are required to analyze assigned cases carefully, develop and discuss new cases, and present a well-developed new business proposal to the class.

    Emphasis is placed on creating a framework to analyze business opportunities of all sizes. The centerpiece is a set of models abstracted from the cases prepared during the course. These models allow students to categorize ideas quickly, discuss benefits, note problems, and ideally, predict performance.

    The class is not a series of "nuts and bolts" lectures about running small businesses, nor is it a guest lecture series. Participants must be willing to become involved with the material and approach the topic with analytic rigor. From that effort, an organized way of thinking should evolve that will allow students to make better decisions on potential new venture proposals.
    Format
    • Lectures

    • Discussion

    • Case Studies

    • Group Projects

    • Group Presentations

    • Ethics discussion/component

  • Prerequisites
    It is mandatory to attend the first class session, even if the student has not been formally admitted.
  • Materials
    Course readings in Canvas, and current articles from the Wall Street Journal and other sources.
    Resources
    • Canvas Site Available

  • Grades
    Based on quality of class participation; weekly written work completed individually; and group presentation of original business start-up ideas.

    Auditors permitted only in their last quarter of Chicago Booth residency, limited to room capacity, and must have written approval from the instructor to attend.

    Provisional grades will be available for those graduating. No pass/fail grades.
    Grades
    • Graded homework assignments

    • Graded attendance/participation

    • Mandatory attendance week 1

    Assessment & Testing
    • Quizzes

    • Final Presentation

    • Final Project

    Restrictions
    • No pass/fail grades

  • Syllabus
  • Autumn 2020Section: 34102-81TH 6:00PM-9:00PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Winter 2021Section: 34102-02TH 1:30PM-4:30PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Spring 2021Section: 34102-81TH 6:00PM-9:00PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
Description and/or course criteria last updated: July 15 2020 
  • Schrager, James
  • Content
    This course builds non-mathematical models of success in the world of entrepreneurial business through intensive analyses of both archival and current cases. Students are required to analyze assigned cases carefully, develop and discuss current cases, and present a well-developed new business proposal to the class.

    Emphasis is placed on creating a framework to analyze business opportunities of all sizes. The centerpiece is a set of models abstracted from the cases prepared during the course. These models allow students to categorize ideas quickly, discuss benefits, note problems, and ideally, predict performance.

    The class is not a series of "nuts and bolts" lectures about running small businesses, nor is it a guest lecture series. Participants must be willing to become involved with the material and approach the topic with analytic rigor. From that effort, an organized way of thinking should evolve that will allow students to make better decisions on potential new venture proposals.

    Please note that rescheduled class sessions will be required to allow for presentation of group projects to the class. See the Curriculum web page on the Chicago Booth Portal for details which vary by quarter regarding when these special sessions will be held.
    Format
    • Lectures

    • Discussion

    • Case Studies

    • Group Projects

    • Group Presentations

    • Ethics discussion/component

  • Prerequisites
    Permission of instructor is required if a student has not completed one-half of the MBA program (at least 10 classes: strict).

    It is mandatory to attend the first class session.
    Restrictions
    • No non-Booth Students

    • Strict Prerequisite

  • Materials
    Electronic case materials posted on Canvas and current articles from the Wall Street Journal.
    Resources
    • Canvas Site Available

  • Grades
    Based on quality of in-class participation; weekly written case work completed in study groups of three to five students (each paper limited to two pages); an individual case about a real entrepreneur (also limited to two pages); and study group presentations of original business start-up ideas.

    Provisional grades will be available for those graduating.
    Grades
    • Graded homework assignments

    • Graded attendance/participation

    • Mandatory attendance week 1

    • Allow Provisional Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)

    • Early Final Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)

    Assessment & Testing
    • Final exam (in class)

    • Final exam (take home)

    Restrictions
    • No auditors

  • Syllabus
  • Autumn 2020Section: 34102-01TH 1:30PM-4:30PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Winter 2021Section: 34102-01F 1:30PM-4:30PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Winter 2021Section: 34102-85S 1:30PM-4:30PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Spring 2021Section: 34102-01TH 1:30PM-4:30PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
  • Summer 2021Section: 34102-81M 6:00PM-9:00PMLocation: TBDRemote-Only
Description and/or course criteria last updated: February 17 2020